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Tag: Security

What it’s like using the Owl car security camera

March 19, 2018 No Comments

When you get a new car, and you’re feeling like a star, the first thing you’re probably going to do is ghost ride it. This is where the Owl camera can come in.

I’ve been testing Owl, an always-on, two-way camera that records everything that’s happening inside and outside of your car all day, every day for the last couple of weeks.

The Owl camera is designed to monitor your car for break-ins, collisions and police stops. Owl can also be used to capture fun moments (see above) on the road or beautiful scenery, simply by saying, ‘Ok, presto.’

If Owl senses a car accident, it automatically saves the video to your phone, including the 10 seconds before and after the accident. Also, if someone is attracted to your car because of the camera and its blinking green light, and proceeds to steal it, Owl will give you another one.

For 24 hours, you can view your driving and any other incidents that happened during the day. You can also, of course, save footage to your phone so you can watch it after 24 hours.

Setting it up

The two-way camera plugs into your car’s on-board diagnostics port (Every car built after 1996 has one), and takes just a few minutes to set up. The camera tucks right in between the dashboard and windshield. Once it’s hooked up, you can access your car’s camera anytime via the Owl mobile app.

I was a bit skeptical about the ease with which I’d be able to install the camera, but it was actually pretty easy. From opening the box to getting the camera up and running, it took fewer than ten minutes.

Accessing the footage

This is where it can get a little tricky. If you want to save footage after the fact, Owl requires that you be physically near the camera. That meant I had to put on real clothes and walk outside to my car to access the footage from the past 24 hours in order to connect to the Owl’s Wi-Fi. Eventually, however, Owl says it will be possible to access that footage over LTE.

But that wasn’t my only qualm with footage access. Once I tried to download the footage, the app would often crash or only download a portion of the footage I requested. This, however, should be easily fixable, given Owl is set up for over-the-air updates. In fact, Owl told me the company is aware of that issue and is releasing a fix this week. If I want to see the live footage, though, that’s easy to access.

Notifications

Owl is set up to let you know if and when something happens to your car while you’re not there. My Owl’s out-of-the-box settings were set to high sensitivity, which meant I received notifications if a car simply drove by. Changing the settings to a lower sensitivity fixed the annoyance of too many notifications.

Since installing the Owl camera, there hasn’t been a situation in which I was notified of any nefarious behavior happening in or around my car. But I do rest assured knowing that if something does happen, I’ll be notified right away and will be able to see live footage of whatever it is that’s happening.

My understanding is that most of the dash cams on the market aren’t set up to give you 24/7 video access, nor are they designed to be updatable over the air. The best-selling dash cam on Amazon, for example, is a one-way facing camera with collision detection, but it’s not always on. That one retails for about $ 100 while Amazon’s Choice is one that costs just $ 47.99, and comes with Wi-Fi to enable real-time viewing and video playback.

Owl is much more expensive than its competition, retailing at $ 299, with LTE service offered at $ 10 per month. Currently, Owl is only available as a bundle for $ 349, which includes one year of the LTE service.

Unlike Owl’s competition, however, the device is always on, due to the fact it plugs into your car’s OMD port. That’s the main, most attractive differentiator for me. To be clear, while the Owl does suck energy from your car’s battery, it’s smart enough to know when it needs to shutdown. Last weekend, I didn’t drive my car for over 24 hours, so Owl shut itself down to ensure my battery wasn’t dead once I came back.

Owl, which launched last month, has $ 18 million in funding from Defy Ventures, Khosla Ventures, Menlo Ventures, Sherpa Capital and others. The company was founded by Andy Hodge, a former product lead at Apple and executive at Dropcam, and Nathan Ackerman, who formerly led development for Microsoft’s HoloLens.

P.S. I was listening to “Finesse” by Bruno Mars and Cardi B in the GIF above.

Gadgets – TechCrunch


Hunter2 wants to teach engineers to handle web app security with a hands-on approach

February 27, 2018 No Comments

 When Equifax was broken into late last year — one of the biggest security breaches in recent history — Fletcher Heisler wanted to make sure security engineers got to know exactly what happened right away, and how to fix it. That’s part of the goal of Hunter2, a new online learning platform for security engineers that’s designed to teach them how to handle these kinds… Read More
Enterprise – TechCrunch


Oracle grabs Zenedge as it continues to beef up its cloud security play

February 17, 2018 No Comments

 Oracle announced yesterday that it intends to acquire Zenedge, a 4-year old hybrid security startup. They didn’t reveal a purchase price. With Zenedge, Oracle gets a security service to add it to its growing cloud play. In this case, the company has products to protect customers whether in the cloud, on-prem or across hybrid environments. The company offers a range of services from… Read More
Enterprise – TechCrunch


Sumo Logic expands security toolset with FactorChain acquisition

January 23, 2018 No Comments

 When we heard from Sumo Logic last June, the company was announcing a $ 75 million Series F. Today, they announced they were acquiring FactorChain, a security startup that has raised $ 3.6 million. The companies would not disclose the purchase price, but indicated the acquisition closed at the end of Q4 and all 12 FactorChain employees have joined Sumo Logic, including CEO Dave Frampton and CTO… Read More
Enterprise – TechCrunch


Ooma acquires AI-powered video camera platform Butterfleye for its home security service

December 20, 2017 No Comments

 Ooma, the company that’s probably still best known for its VoIP platform, today announced that it has acquired Butterfleye, an AI-powered video camera and security platform that produces a smart security camera for home and business use. Ooma plans to integrate Butterfleye’s camera into its Ooma Home security solution, but the company will also continue to sell the camera under… Read More
Startups – TechCrunch


Security News This Week: Germany’s Election Software Is Dangerously Hackable

September 10, 2017 No Comments

Plus researchers revealed a technique called “DolphinAttack” that could allow hackers to silently “speak” to nearby voice assistants.
Feed: All Latest


Google launches new security features to protect users from unverified apps

July 19, 2017 No Comments

 Google has been steadily adding new security features for its G Suite users over the course of the last few months, including new anti-phishing tools and OAuth apps whitelisting, as well as an enhanced app review process. Today, it’s adding another layer on top of this with the launch of a new “unverified app” screen for new web applications and Apps Scripts. This new screen… Read More
Enterprise – TechCrunch


UK spy agency-backed cyber security incubator picks first seven startups

January 11, 2017 No Comments

GCHQ at Cheltenham, Gloucestershire A GCHQ-backed startup incubator has opened its doors in the UK, announcing its first cohort of seven startups participating in the three month accelerator program (see below for the list of teams). Read More
Startups – TechCrunch


Security News This Week: Hey, Remember That Time Hackers Breached a Billion Yahoo Accounts?

December 18, 2016 No Comments
Security News This Week: Hey, Remember That Time Hackers Breached a Billion Yahoo Accounts?

Each weekend we round up the news stories that we didn’t break or cover in depth but that still deserve your attention. The post Security News This Week: Hey, Remember That Time Hackers Breached a Billion Yahoo Accounts? appeared first on WIRED.
WIRED


Bromium trap

Bromium Raises $40M For Security Technology That Traps Malware And Limits Attacks

October 31, 2013 No Comments
Bromium has raised $ 40 million for its micro virtual machine (micro-vm) technology that traps malware and analyzes it for IT administrators to examine once an attack takes place. The oversubscribed Series C funding round was led by new investor Meritech Capital Partners, with participation from existing investors Andreessen Horowitz, Ignition Partners, Highland Capital Partners, and Intel Capital. The company has now raised $ 75.7 million since founded in 2010.
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