CBPO

Tag: Studio”

Access Google Surveys and Google Analytics 4 data in Data Studio

March 6, 2021 No Comments

Today, Data Studio users can access over 300 data sets in just a couple clicks. From Google Ads to BigQuery to your CRM data, you can spend more time finding and sharing insights and less time configuring data sources. With two brand new data connectors you can access even more data through Data Studio to help you analyze your marketing investments and make decisions. You can now access your market research data with our new Google Surveys connector and connect to the next generation of Google Analytics with support for Google Analytics 4 properties. 

Google Surveys give you a quick, cost-effective way to get valuable insights into the minds of your target audience. Gather the insights you need to make smarter, faster business decisions—in a fraction of the time it takes for traditional market research. With the new Data Studio integration, you can quickly visualize your Surveys data alongside your marketing data from sources like Google Ads and Google Analytics.

Google Surveys report in Data Studio

Google Surveys report in Data Studio 

We’ve made it easy to visualize your Google Surveys data. Simply click “View report in Data Studio” when you’re in Google Surveys to see your survey data in a template that you can customize and share in a couple clicks.

View your report in Data Studio in one click

View your report in Data Studio in one click

In addition to expanding access to Google Surveys, we’re also excited to announce support for Google Analytics 4 properties. You can now connect to your Google Analytics 4 properties in Data Studio along with your Universal Analytics properties.

Google Analytics 4 report in Data Studio

Google Analytics 4 report in Data Studio

Accessing the data you need to make better decisions is only the first step. Finding insights from the data and determining the best way to communicate the insights to stakeholders can be challenging and time consuming. We’re making it easier to get started with new marketing templates across common data sets like Google Ads, Search Ads 360 and more. You can find over 30 solutions to help you get started in the Data Studio gallery.

New Google Ads performance report in Data Studio solution gallery

New Google Ads performance report in Data Studio solution gallery

We are excited to hear how these new data connections and template solutions help you find insights and make decisions. Drop us a line in our community forum to let us know what’s working well and what you’re excited for next. 


Google Analytics Blog


Hasselblad X1D II 50C: out of the studio and into the streets

February 17, 2021 No Comments

We crawled into an abandoned school bus, trespassed through dilapidated hallways, dodged fleeting thunderstorms, and wandered the empty streets of Chinatown late into the evening. For two summery weeks, I couldn’t have been happier.

New York City was in lockdown. I’d been quarantined in my dinky apartment, disheartened and restless. I was anxious to do something creative. Thankfully, the Hasselblad X1D II 50C arrived for review, along with approval from the studio heads for socially-distanced, outdoor shoots.

Taking pictures of the mundane (flowers, buildings, and such) would’ve been a disservice to a $ 10,000 camera kit, so instead, my friends and I collaborated on a fun, little project: we shot portraits inspired by our favorite films.

Hasselblad X1D II shotlist

Image Credits: Veanne Cao

Equipped with masks and a bottle of hand sanitizer, we put the X1D II 50C and 80mm F/1.9 lens (ideal for close-ups without actually having to be close up) through its paces in some of NYC’s less familiar backdrops.

Before I get into any trouble for the last photo – Alex and Jason are professional stuntmen and that’s a rubber prop gun. They were reenacting the penultimate scene from Infernal Affairs – a brilliant piece of Hong Kong cinema (much better than the Scorsese remake).

While the camera is slightly more approachable in terms of cost and ease of use with a few upgrades (larger, more responsive rear screen, a cleaned-up menu, tethering capabilities, faster startup time and shutter release), the X1D II is essentially the same as its predecessor. So I skipped the standard review. Hasselblad X1D II 50C Hasselblad X1D II 50C

Image Credits: Veanne Cao

What it is, what it isn’t

The most common complaint about the X1D was its slow autofocus, slow shutter release and short battery life. The X1D II improved on these features, though not by much. Rather than seeing the lag as a hindrance, I was forced to slow down and re-wire my brain for a more thoughtful shooting style (a pleasant side effect).

As I mentioned in my X1D review, Apple and other smartphone manufacturers have made shooting great pictures effortless. As such, the accessibility has created a culture of excessively capturing everyday banalities. You shoot far more than you’ll ever need. It’s something I’m guilty of. Pretty sure 90% of the images on my iPhone camera roll are throwaways. (The other 10% are of my dog and he’s spectacularly photogenic.)

The X1D II, however, is not an easy camera. It’s frustrating at times. If you’re a beginner, you may have to learn the fundamentals (ISO, f-stops, when to click the shutter), but the payoff is worth it. There’s an overwhelming sense of gratification when you get that one shot. And at 50 megapixels, it’s packed with details and worthy of hanging on your wall. Shelling out a ton of money for the X1D II won’t instantly make you a better photographer, but it ought to encourage you to become one.

Without the contrived studio lights and set design, our outdoor shoots became an exercise in improvisation:  we wandered through the boroughs finding practicals (street lights, neon lights… the sun), discovering locations, and switching spots when things didn’t pan out.

We explored, we had purpose.

My takeaway from the two weeks with this camera:  pause and be meaningful in your actions.

Reviewed kit runs $ 10,595, pre-taxed:
Hasselblad X1D II 50C Mirrorless Camera – $ 5,750
Hasselblad 80mm F/1.9 XCD Lens – $ 4,845

Gadgets – TechCrunch


Data Studio Tips Part 2: Intermediate

August 11, 2020 No Comments

Google’s Data Studio is a great tool for visualization and reporting, but it comes with its own learning curve. This post covers tips for intermediate users.

Read more at PPCHero.com
PPC Hero


Data Studio Tips Part 1: Beginner

August 5, 2020 No Comments

Google’s Data Studio is a great tool for reporting, but it comes with its own learning curve. This post contains 3 data studio tips for beginners.

Read more at PPCHero.com
PPC Hero


Data Studio Showdown: Dashboards vs Reports

August 30, 2019 No Comments

Do your clients need automated dashboards or narrative reporting? Learn how to create (and deliver) each using Google’s free Data Studio.

Read more at PPCHero.com
PPC Hero


A summary of Google Data Studio: Updates from April 2019

May 14, 2019 No Comments

April was a big month for Google Data Studio (GDS), with Google introducing some significant product updates to this already robust reporting tool.

For those not familiar with GDS, it is a free dashboard-style reporting tool that Google rolled out in June 2016. With Data Studio, users can connect to various data sources to visualize, and share data from a variety of web-based platforms.

GDS supports native integrations with most Google products including Analytics, Google Ads, Search Ads 360 (formerly Doubleclick Search), Google Sheets, YouTube Analytics, and Google BigQuery.

GDS supports connectors that users can purchase to import data from over one hundred third-party sources such as Bing Ads, Amazon Ads, and many others.  

Sample Google Data studio dashboard

Source: Google

1. Google introduces BigQuery BI Engine for integration with GDS

BigQuery is Google’s massive enterprise data warehouse. It enables extremely fast SQL queries by using the same technology that powers Google Search. Per Google,

“Every day, customers upload petabytes of new data into BigQuery, our exabyte-scale, serverless data warehouse, and the volume of data analyzed has grown by over 300 percent in just the last year.”

BigQuery BI Engine stores, analyzes, and finds insights on your data Image Source: Google

Source: Google

2. Enhanced data drill-down capabilities

You can now reveal additional levels of detail in a single chart using GDS’s enhanced data drill down (or drill up) capabilities.

You’ll need to enable this feature in each specific GDS chart and, once enabled, you can drill down from a higher level of detail to a lower one (for example, country to a city). You can also drill up from a lower level of detail to a higher one (for example, city to the country). You must be in “View” mode to drill up or drill down (as opposed to the “Edit” mode).

Here’s an example of drilling-up in a chart that uses Google’s sample data in GDS.

GDS chart showing clicks by month

Source: Google

To drill-up by year, right click on the chart in “View” mode and select “Drill up” as shown below.

GDS chart showing the option to “Drill up” the monthly data to yearly data

Visit the Data Studio Help website for detailed instructions on how to leverage this feature.

3. Improved formatting of tables

GDS now allows for more user-friendly and intuitive table formatting. This includes the ability to distribute columns evenly with just one click (by right-clicking the table), resizing only one column by dragging the column’s divider, and changing the justification of table contents to left, right, or center via the “Style” properties panel in “Edit” mode.

Example of editing, table properties tab in GDS

Source: Google

Detailed instructions on how to access this feature are located here.

4. The ability to hide pages in “View” mode

GDS users can now hide pages in “View” mode by right clicking on the specific page (accessed via the top submenu), clicking on the three vertical dots to the right of the page name, and selecting “Hide page in view mode”. This feature comes in handy when you’ve got pages you don’t want your client (or anyone) to see when presenting the GDS report.

The new “Hide page” feature in GDS

Source: Google

5. Page canvas size enhancements

Users can now customize each page’s size with a new feature that was rolled out on March 21st (we’re sneaking this into the April update because it’s a really neat feature).

Canvas size settings can be accessed from the page menu at the top of the GDS interface. Select Page>Current Page Settings, and then select “Style” from the settings area at the right of the screen. You can then choose your page size from a list of pre-configured sizes or set a custom size of your own.

GDS Page Settings Wizard

Source: Google

6. New Data Studio help community

As GDS adds more features and becomes more complex, it seems only fitting that Google would launch a community help forum for this tool. So, while this isn’t exactly a new feature to GDS itself, it is a new resource for GDS users that will hopefully make navigating GDS easier.

Users can access the GDS Help Community via Google’s support website or selecting “Help Options” from the top menu bar in GDS (indicated by a question mark icon) then click the “Visit Help Forum” link.

The Help menu within GDS

Source: Google

Conclusion

We hope that summarizing the latest GDS enhancements has made it a little easier to digest the many new changes that Google rolled out in April (and March). Remember, you can always get a list of updates, both new and old by visiting Google’s Support website here.

Jacqueline Dooley is the Director of Digital Strategy at CommonMind.

The post A summary of Google Data Studio: Updates from April 2019 appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Search Engine Watch


Introducing the Data Studio Community Connector Codelab

May 12, 2018 No Comments

Posted by Minhaz Kazi, Developer Advocate, Google Data Studio

Data Studio is Google’s free next gen business intelligence and data visualization platform. Community Connectors for Data Studio let you build connectors to any internet-accessible data source using Google Apps Script. You can build Community Connectors for commercial, enterprise, and personal use. Learn how to build Community Connectors using the Data Studio Community Connector Codelab.

Use the Community Connector Codelab

The Community Connector Codelab explains how Community Connectors work and provides a step by step tutorial for creating your first Community Connector. You can get started if you have a basic understanding of Javascript and web APIs. You should be able to build your first connector in 30 mins using the Codelab.

If you have previously imported data into Google Sheets using Apps Script, you can use this Codelab to get familiar with the Community Connectors and quickly port your code to fetch your data directly into Data Studio.

Why create your own Community Connector

Community Connectors can help you to quickly deliver an end-to-end visualization solution that is user-friendly and delivers high user value with low development efforts. Community Connectors can help you build a reporting solution for personal, public, enterprise, or commercial data, and also do explanatory visualizations.

  • If you provide a web based service to customers, you can create template dashboards or even let your users create their own visualization based on the users’ data from your service.
  • Within an enterprise, you can create serverless and highly scalable reporting solutions where you have complete control over your data and sharing features.
  • You can create an aggregate view of all your metrics across different commercial platforms and service providers while providing drill down capabilities.
  • You can create connectors to public and open datasets. Sharing these connectors will enable other users to quickly gain access to these datasets and dive into analysis directly without writing any code.

By building a Community Connector, you can go from scratch to a push button customized dashboard solution for your service in a matter of hours.

The following dashboard uses Community Connectors to fetch data from Stack Overflow, GitHub, and Twitter. Try using the date filter to view changes across all sources:

This dashboard uses the following Community Connectors:

You can build your own connector to any preferred service and publish it in the Community Connector gallery. The Community Connector gallery now has over 70 Partner Connectors connecting to more than 400 data sources.

Once you have completed the Codelab, view the Community Connector documentation and sample code on the Data Studio open source repository to build your own connector.


Google Analytics Blog


Data Studio: Richer Visualizations and Analytical Functions

February 3, 2018 No Comments
The Data Studio team has been hard at work launching new features to allow for richer visualization and new views on data. Today, we’ll highlight some of these recent launches.

Pivot Tables

Pivot tables let users narrow down a large data set or analyze relationships between data points. Additionally, they reorganize user’s dimensions and metrics to help quickly summarize data and see relationships that might otherwise be hard to spot.

Example Pivot Table (Help center doc here)

Coordinated Coloring

Coordinated coloring allows users to bind colors to specific data. When a user creates visualizations, Data Studio automatically binds colors to data, so that color:data pairs stay consistent between visualizations and when filtering. This feature is automatically turned on for all new reports, and available in old reports.

Example Coordinated Coloring (Help center doc here)

Google Analytics Sampling Indicator

Google Analytics samples data in order to provide accurate reporting in a timely manner. Data Studio now shows a sampling indicator in Data Studio reports when a component contains sampled Analytics data.

GA Sampling indicator (Help center doc here)

Field Reports Editing

Data Studio has also recently added new options to the chips in reporting. These new options allow you to:

  • Rename fields
  • Change aggregation types
  • Change semantic types
  • Change date functions
  • Apply % of total, difference from total, or percent difference from total to a metric from within the report.

Example of new field editing options (Help center doc here).

Submitting and voting for new features

The Data Studio team will continue to introduce new features and product enhancements based on your submissions. You can view requests submitted by other users, upvote your favorites, or create new ones. Learn more here.


Google Analytics Blog


Open Source Community Connectors for Data Studio

January 27, 2018 No Comments

More than six hundred developers have signed up for developer access to Data Studio Community Connectors since the Developer Launch. Community Connectors give developers an opportunity to come up with innovative solutions for data access and broaden the scope of data sources users can connect to.

Based on community feedback, we recognized that many of you are looking to share your work on connectors with the community. Also, developers are looking for more examples to follow. With these community needs in mind, today, we are announcing the Open Source Community Connectors repository on GitHub.

Use open source Community Connectors

For every connector that is hosted in the open source repository, the Data Studio Developer Relations team will manage a deployment for the connector’s latest code. This managed deployment will enable all users to immediately try the connector in Data Studio by simply clicking a link. Managed deployments also make it easier for developers since you do not have to deploy and maintain the connectors yourself; we’ll take care of this for you.

You can try out the following Open Source connectors directly in Data Studio:

Example dashboards using these connectors:


Learn about best practices

If you want to connect to new Data Sources using Data Studio but have not yet looked into Community Connectors, now would be the best time to start since a variety of example connector code have become available. These examples will give you a head start and create a platform for you to learn and share with other community members.

Initially, we are releasing these connectors in our open source repository:

Contribute to the community

If want to submit your own open source connector to the repository, you can send us a pull request. Alternatively you can maintain your own repository and link to that from the official repository.

This Git repository is a small start where we plan to make new additions. We have already seen other open source Community Connectors like data.world and getSTAT. We are hoping that initiative will help developers and users to create connectors to new Data Sources and thus make more data accessible in Data Studio. Developers can also collaborate with each other as well as report new issues and fix existing ones through these open source connectors.

This collaboration platform gives developers the option to leverage support from the community. If you want to develop your own connector but are unable to maintain it in the long run, you can add it to our repository so that the community can support it.

Visit the repository and start building your own Community Connector today!

Posted by Minhaz Kazi, Google Analytics team


Google Analytics Blog


Get the most out of Data Studio Community Connectors

December 5, 2017 No Comments

Data Studio Community Connectors enable direct connections from Data Studio to any internet accessible data source. Anyone can build their own Community Connector or use any available ones.

Try out the new Community Connectors in the gallery

We have recently added additional Community Connectors to the Data Studio Community Connector gallery from developers including: DataWorx, Digital Inspiration, G4interactive, Kevpedia, Marketing Miner, MarketLytics, Mito, Power My Analytics, ReportGarden, and Supermetrics. These connectors will let you access data from additional external sources, leveraging Data Studio as a free and powerful reporting and analysis solution. You can now use more than 50 Community Connectors from within the Gallery to access all your data.

Try out these free Community Connectors: Salesforce, Twitter, Facebook Marketing.

Find the connector you need

In the Data Studio Community Connector gallery, it is possible for multiple connectors to connect to the same data source. There are also instances where a single connector can connect to multiple data sources. To help users find the connector they need, we have added the Data Sources page where you can search for Data Sources and see what connectors are available to use. The connector list includes native connectors in Data Studio as well as verified and Open Source Community Connectors. You can directly use the connectors by clicking the direct links on the Data Sources page.

Vote for your data source

If your data source is not available to use through any existing connector, you can Vote for your data source. This will let developers know which Data Sources are most in demand. Developers should also let us know which Community Connector you are building. We will use this information to update the Data Sources page.

Tell us your story

If you have any interesting connector stories, ideas, or if you’d like to share some amazing reports you’ve created using Community Connectors please let us know by giving us a shout or send us your story at community-connector-feedback@google.com.


Google Analytics Blog